November 5th, 2012
onaissues
Journalism Accelerator, Kent State University, the Poynter Institute, and the Civic Commons have partnered to answer a number of questions that digital journalists face when covering politics. They are crowdsourcing answers to the questions below, and will be compiling the answers in an Ethics Best Practices Guide to Political Coverage.

What happens when social media and political coverage collide? How do you handle the challenges of “access journalism” like requests for quote approval? How can journalists keep politicians honest? Could a different approach to reporting improve the flow of information to voters?

Join the conversation on the Journalism Accelerator website. 

Journalism Accelerator, Kent State University, the Poynter Institute, and the Civic Commons have partnered to answer a number of questions that digital journalists face when covering politics. They are crowdsourcing answers to the questions below, and will be compiling the answers in an Ethics Best Practices Guide to Political Coverage.

What happens when social media and political coverage collide? How do you handle the challenges of “access journalism” like requests for quote approval? How can journalists keep politicians honest? Could a different approach to reporting improve the flow of information to voters?

Join the conversation on the Journalism Accelerator website

October 31st, 2012
onaissues
Despite the usual complaints of lack of access to candidates — practically speaking, there isn’t any — the power dynamics between the campaigns and the media have shifted significantly toward reporters. And the old journalistic hierarchy that once aggrandized major newspapers and national networks has flattened out, giving any boy, girl or baby on the bus with a Twitter feed the same opportunity to drive the race as the most established brand names.

For campaigns’ traveling press corps, social media has changed way game is played - The Washington Post

The Washington Post looks at how the power dynamics have changed between the traveling press and the Presidential candidates, emphasizing the influence that reporters have on social media.  

October 22nd, 2012
onaissues
jcstearns:

Join the Money, Media and Elections National “Data Happy Hour”
What are you up to on Thursday night from 5-8 pm? 
On Thursday we are working with our friends at the Sunlight Foundation to host a national Money, Media and Elections “Data Happy Hour”. Sunlight is opening their offices in Boston and DC and we are inviting people into the Free Press offices in Western Massachusetts. (You can also join in live anywhere via a video chat!) More info is available here: http://www.freepress.net/blog/2012/10/19/join-money-media-and-elections-national-data-happy-hour
We’ll be using the new interactive PoliticalAdSleuth.com database to input data from the political files and make it searchable, sortable and more useful for journalists, advocates and citizens. No tech skills needed.  
RSVP on Facebook here or drop me a line at jstearns@freepress.net. 
Boston, Mass. - http://www.meetup.com/SunlightFoundation/Boston-MA/817782/
Washington, D.C. - https://www.facebook.com/events/327298567367711/
Western Massachusetts - https://www.facebook.com/events/372986749447927

jcstearns:

Join the Money, Media and Elections National “Data Happy Hour”

What are you up to on Thursday night from 5-8 pm? 

On Thursday we are working with our friends at the Sunlight Foundation to host a national Money, Media and Elections “Data Happy Hour”. Sunlight is opening their offices in Boston and DC and we are inviting people into the Free Press offices in Western Massachusetts. (You can also join in live anywhere via a video chat!) More info is available here: http://www.freepress.net/blog/2012/10/19/join-money-media-and-elections-national-data-happy-hour

We’ll be using the new interactive PoliticalAdSleuth.com database to input data from the political files and make it searchable, sortable and more useful for journalists, advocates and citizens. No tech skills needed.  

RSVP on Facebook here or drop me a line at jstearns@freepress.net

Boston, Mass. - http://www.meetup.com/SunlightFoundation/Boston-MA/817782/

Washington, D.C. - https://www.facebook.com/events/327298567367711/

Western Massachusetts - https://www.facebook.com/events/372986749447927

Reblogged from Talking To Strangers
October 15th, 2012
onaissues
67.2 million viewers tuned into the first debate, according to Nielsen, making it second only to the Super Bowl so far this year. That’s a mind-blowing level of tune-in. More to the point, Mitt Romney clobbered President Obama and in the sort of shift that political operatives dream about, moved four to six points in the polls…
[T]he use of social media, far from pulling away audiences, tends to create a magnetism around big event television. Even those with only a marginal interest in the matter find themselves pulled in by the conversational water cooler that springs up on Facebook and Twitter. But for all the hype about social media and politics — and I’ve dished up my share — the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press found that more than 8 out of 10 viewers of the presidential candidates’ debate simply plopped down in front of their televisions and watched.
October 5th, 2012
onaissues
nyt-agenda:

See all of the fact-checks from NYT reporters.

In addition to these fact-checks from NYT reporters, you can also check out fact-checks from Politfact, who used a handy Truth-o-Meter to rank how true the candidates statements were during the first Presidential debate Wednesday night.
Looking for tips on doing your own fact-checking?  Brendan Nyhan and Jason Reifler have pulled together a toolkit for journalists to counter misinformation  for CJR’s Swing State Project. You can also check out a video on C-SPAN of Nyhan discussing how journalists can increase the likelihood that facts will win out.

nyt-agenda:

See all of the fact-checks from NYT reporters.

In addition to these fact-checks from NYT reporters, you can also check out fact-checks from Politfact, who used a handy Truth-o-Meter to rank how true the candidates statements were during the first Presidential debate Wednesday night.

Looking for tips on doing your own fact-checking?  Brendan Nyhan and Jason Reifler have pulled together a toolkit for journalists to counter misinformation  for CJR’s Swing State Project. You can also check out a video on C-SPAN of Nyhan discussing how journalists can increase the likelihood that facts will win out.

October 2nd, 2012
onaissues
markcoatney:

staff:

LIVE-GIFFING THE 2012 DEBATES!
This Wednesday evening marks the first presidential debate for the 2012 American elections. Elevating the discourse as only Tumblr can, we’ll have a crack team of GIF artists cranking out instant animations of the best debate moments, from zingers to gaffes to awkward silences. Flooding the GIF zone will be our own Topherchris, as well as Bobby Finger, Lacey Micallef, and Mr. GIF. And joining us to further enhance our coverage will be the fine folks at the Guardian, whose liveblog will bring you the full stories behind the GIFs.
The place to take it all in will be the purpose-built Gifwich live-GIFfing blog. Fair warning: Follow Gifwich at your own risk! After all, once each debate begins, your Dashboard could be flooded with animations on a minute-to-minute basis. Your mileage may vary, but if you prefer to just sample the flow, perhaps check out Gifwich directly during the debate and reblog your favorites piecemeal. You can even sample curated real-time selections from the Guardian’sliveblog or Tumblr’s official Election blog.
All debates (and our Gifwich GIF coverage) begin at 9pm Eastern Time:
Wednesday, October 3 - Presidential debate on domestic policy
Thursday, October 11 - Vice-presidential debate on foreign and domestic policy
Tuesday, October 16 - Presidential town meeting on foreign and domestic policy
Monday, October 22 - Presidential debate on foreign policy

Tune in Wednesday. It’s going to be AMAZING.

We think this is great. Tumblr brings news gifs next level this Wednesday.

markcoatney:

staff:

LIVE-GIFFING THE 2012 DEBATES!

This Wednesday evening marks the first presidential debate for the 2012 American elections. Elevating the discourse as only Tumblr can, we’ll have a crack team of GIF artists cranking out instant animations of the best debate moments, from zingers to gaffes to awkward silences. Flooding the GIF zone will be our own Topherchris, as well as Bobby Finger, Lacey Micallef, and Mr. GIF. And joining us to further enhance our coverage will be the fine folks at the Guardian, whose liveblog will bring you the full stories behind the GIFs.

The place to take it all in will be the purpose-built Gifwich live-GIFfing blog. Fair warning: Follow Gifwich at your own risk! After all, once each debate begins, your Dashboard could be flooded with animations on a minute-to-minute basis. Your mileage may vary, but if you prefer to just sample the flow, perhaps check out Gifwich directly during the debate and reblog your favorites piecemeal. You can even sample curated real-time selections from the Guardian’sliveblog or Tumblr’s official Election blog.

All debates (and our Gifwich GIF coverage) begin at 9pm Eastern Time:

  • Wednesday, October 3 - Presidential debate on domestic policy
  • Thursday, October 11 - Vice-presidential debate on foreign and domestic policy
  • Tuesday, October 16 - Presidential town meeting on foreign and domestic policy
  • Monday, October 22 - Presidential debate on foreign policy

Tune in Wednesday. It’s going to be AMAZING.

We think this is great. Tumblr brings news gifs next level this Wednesday.

August 30th, 2012
onaissues

futurejournalismproject:

Reddit Crashes. Blame Obama.

President Obama is/was starting an AMA (Ask Me Anything) appearance on Reddit and the service buckled under.

It’s back up though. You can follow the thread here.

Reddit, I am Barack Obama, President of the United States — AMA.

Reddit makes the news/is the news again this year. 

Reblogged from The FJP
August 29th, 2012
onaissues
pewinternet:

Obama Outpaces Romney in Direct Voter Communications on Web, Social Media
At the time of analysis (June 4-17, 2012), the Obama campaign had public accounts on nine separate platforms: Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, YouTube, Flickr, Instagram, Spotify and two accounts on Twitter (@BarackObama and @Obama2012).
That is twice that of the Romney campaign, which had public accounts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and Google+. Romney has since expanded his presence, adding accounts on Tumblr and Spotify.
 The Obama campaign is also substantially more active in these domains. Across all the platforms studied, the Obama campaign posted nearly four times as much content as the Romney campaign-614 Obama posts compared with 168 posts for Romney.The gap in activity was greatest on Twitter. Romney averaged one tweet a day. Obama averaged 29 tweets a day, (17 per day on @BarackObama, the Twitter Account associated with his presidency, and 12 on @Obama2012).
New analysis from the Project for Excellence in Journalism: Read more

pewinternet:

Obama Outpaces Romney in Direct Voter Communications on Web, Social Media

At the time of analysis (June 4-17, 2012), the Obama campaign had public accounts on nine separate platforms: Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, YouTube, Flickr, Instagram, Spotify and two accounts on Twitter (@BarackObama and @Obama2012).

That is twice that of the Romney campaign, which had public accounts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and Google+. Romney has since expanded his presence, adding accounts on Tumblr and Spotify.

 The Obama campaign is also substantially more active in these domains. Across all the platforms studied, the Obama campaign posted nearly four times as much content as the Romney campaign-614 Obama posts compared with 168 posts for Romney.

The gap in activity was greatest on Twitter. Romney averaged one tweet a day. Obama averaged 29 tweets a day, (17 per day on @BarackObama, the Twitter Account associated with his presidency, and 12 on @Obama2012).

New analysis from the Project for Excellence in Journalism: Read more

Reblogged from The FJP
August 28th, 2012
onaissues
Four years ago, the fallout from a controversial remark would have taken hours, if not a full day, to unfold. In 2012, social media, which enables reporters to file in real-time and puts increased pressure on campaigns to speed up their response time, has brought the pace of the news cycle down to a matter of minutes and seconds. The ‘one-day story’ — itself an archaic term in the 21st century — has become the one-hour story.
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