November 26th, 2012
onaissues
Should people pay journalists and photojournalists to do what they do? As long as someone wants credible information the role of the professional remains important, but the role changes in that professionals are no longer the eyewitness. Think of all those [photography compilation] books in the 20th century which were called “eye witness” or “the eyes of the world” or something similar. That’s no longer relevant when there are 4 billion cellphone eyes out there.

Professionals are valuable as commentators, interpreters, validators. We know what is happening in Syria but for sifting all the detail and taking a position on all of that, we still look to the professionals.

Last year, during the Arab Spring, it was the “good little guy” against the “big bad guy”. Simple. Now, we are seeing is a much more complex mix of bad little guys as well a good little guys. I am learning all the different computations from experts — people who are studying the form, researching it, being present and reporting back out. That’s not something I can put together from Facebook. I need someone to guide me through that very complex area.
Stephen Mayes, Director, VII Photo Agency, in an interview with Wired. Photographs Are No Longer Things, They’re Experiences. (via futurejournalismproject)
Reblogged from The FJP
October 2nd, 2012
onaissues
You want [the] person who you interview to tell the story – get them to sell the story. You are the moderator guiding the audience through the story – pulling the cuts/actualities that you think may work the best.

Rolando Arrieta, Senior producer at NPR, gives tips on producing a great audio slide show.

Get more tips on Advancing the Story: NPR journalists talk audio slide shows

July 10th, 2012
onaissues
Reblogged from birch & lily
March 12th, 2012
onaissues

reuters:

Reuters photographer Damir Sagolj has won the Reuters Photo of the Year award for this image captured in North Korea in 2011.

“After days of excitement and lots of rare pictures in the provinces, I came back to Pyongyang without big plans for shooting in the capital. All I wanted were some moody general views of the city,” Sagolj wrote. “This is probably the easiest big picture I shot for a long time - it was taken from the window of my hotel room in Pyongyang early morning, just before the sunrise. I knew that portrait was there and I insisted with our hosts to get a room on a very high floor facing that direction. So, all I had to do is to wake up early in the morning, make a coffee, light a cigarette and make sure I exposed well. The scene has this eerie look for maybe 5 to 10 minutes, then the revolutionary songs and propaganda speeches from loudspeakers wake the city up.”

The photo shows a picture of North Korea’s founder Kim Il-sung decorating a building in the capital of Pyongyang on October 5, 2011.

See more of the best photos from 2011

Reblogged from Reuters
February 28th, 2012
onaissues

shortformblog:

Protip: If you see an image that seems a touch “unbelievable,” especially if it comes from an untested source like a brand-new blog, there’s a chance it may be fake. Very fake, even. That’s the story of this receipt that seemingly mocks the 99 percent, but is actually from a blog that’s already been taken off the Internet.

Reblogged from ShortFormBlog
February 28th, 2012
onaissues

Monday, the New York Times launched the Lively Morgue, a new Tumblr to showcase photos from their massive archive. We love this vintage photo which shows images being sorted. We’re interested in seeing how they work with NYT’s Lens blog. Welcome to Tumblr!

livelymorgue:

An archival photo from The New York Times shows news pictures being sorted in the newspaper’s photo “morgue,” which houses millions of images. Here they are — several each week — for you to see. Welcome to The Lively Morgue. Photo: The New York Times  

Reblogged from The Lively Morgue
February 22nd, 2012
onaissues

Rémi Ochlik won the first prize for the 2012 World Press Photo for his series, “Battle for Libya.” 

In this photo, “An opposition fighter rest under a rebellion flag in the middle of the battlefield oil town Ras Lanouf in Libya.”

See his full award winning portfolio on World Press Photo.

February 16th, 2012
onaissues
A photograph from the series Welcome Home: The Scott Ostrom Story by Craig Walker, who was just named Photographer of the Year in the University of Missouri’s annual Pictures of the Year International.
The Washington Post wrote:

In honoring Walker’s portfolio, the judges noted a strong balance of powerful aesthetic with solid journalistic content that reflects news events and social issues. Walker’s portfolio presented a stunning project on a Iraq war veteran who suffers from post traumatic stress disorder

Read more about Walker’s work and what it says about the role of photojournalism today on Charles Apple’s blog,  ‘Don’t listen to folks who say newspapers can’t do photo stories these days.’
Via Jim Romensko.

A photograph from the series Welcome Home: The Scott Ostrom Story by Craig Walker, who was just named Photographer of the Year in the University of Missouri’s annual Pictures of the Year International.

The Washington Post wrote:

In honoring Walker’s portfolio, the judges noted a strong balance of powerful aesthetic with solid journalistic content that reflects news events and social issues. Walker’s portfolio presented a stunning project on a Iraq war veteran who suffers from post traumatic stress disorder

Read more about Walker’s work and what it says about the role of photojournalism today on Charles Apple’s blog,  ‘Don’t listen to folks who say newspapers can’t do photo stories these days.’

Via Jim Romensko.

February 8th, 2012
onaissues
Taking street photographs in New York City? The New York Times reports that photographers are facing more obstacles when shooting in public. 
"Ever since Sept. 11, a photographer’s lot in the most photographed city in America has been one of increasing frustration. Police officers, security agents and private guards try to stop journalists and members of the public who are standing in the public way from taking pictures of public events and publicly visible scenes. Almost every time they do so, they are wrong."
Read the full article:  A Reporter With a Camera Is Confronted on Second Avenue - NYTimes.com

Taking street photographs in New York City? The New York Times reports that photographers are facing more obstacles when shooting in public. 

"Ever since Sept. 11, a photographer’s lot in the most photographed city in America has been one of increasing frustration. Police officers, security agents and private guards try to stop journalists and members of the public who are standing in the public way from taking pictures of public events and publicly visible scenes. Almost every time they do so, they are wrong."

Read the full article:  A Reporter With a Camera Is Confronted on Second Avenue - NYTimes.com

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