April 12th, 2013
onaissues

jcstearns:

New York City to Pay $75,000 to Occupy Livestream Collective

When the New York Police Department raided the Occupy encampment in Zuccotti Park on November 15,…

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In his post, Josh Stearns provides more details on the settlement:

In a settlement released this week, New York City agreed to pay the livestream collective Global Revolution TV $75,000 for damage done to their equipment and an additional nearly $50,000 to cover the livestreamers legal fees. (Notably, the settlement also calls for NYC to pay $47,000 for books that were destroyed when police dismantled “the people’s library” in Zuccotti Park.)

Reblogged from Talking To Strangers
July 26th, 2012
onaissues
susie-c:

I fully realize that the “journalist” line becomes blurred for people who ascribe to the View from Nowhere, and I fully realize that I should be used to this by now. But sometimes it still bothers me — like when I have to explain in painful detail to editors who are reluctant to hire me for freelance work that yes, I was arrested while working, and no, I never voted at a general assembly, and no, I never carried a sign. My Occupy reporting has done wonders for my Twitter followers count, but it’s also made a mess for me as a working freelance journalist. I don’t think I would care if this weren’t affecting my livelihood, but maybe I still would. 
Whatever happened doesn’t much seem to matter — it’s all a series of impressions, of truths informed by memories informed by perspectives that we are meant to deny. A View from Nowhere indeed.

Susie Cagle, illustrated journalist who provided excellent real-time updates on the Occupy movement in San Francisco, reflects on how her coverage has impacted her professional life. 
As digital reporters become more embedded in the stories they’re covering, how does this impact how they’re perceived?

susie-c:

I fully realize that the “journalist” line becomes blurred for people who ascribe to the View from Nowhere, and I fully realize that I should be used to this by now. But sometimes it still bothers me — like when I have to explain in painful detail to editors who are reluctant to hire me for freelance work that yes, I was arrested while working, and no, I never voted at a general assembly, and no, I never carried a sign. My Occupy reporting has done wonders for my Twitter followers count, but it’s also made a mess for me as a working freelance journalist. I don’t think I would care if this weren’t affecting my livelihood, but maybe I still would. 

Whatever happened doesn’t much seem to matter — it’s all a series of impressions, of truths informed by memories informed by perspectives that we are meant to deny. A View from Nowhere indeed.

Susie Cagle, illustrated journalist who provided excellent real-time updates on the Occupy movement in San Francisco, reflects on how her coverage has impacted her professional life. 

As digital reporters become more embedded in the stories they’re covering, how does this impact how they’re perceived?

Reblogged from interesting times.
June 12th, 2012
onaissues

Field reporting kit for illustrated journalism and civil unrest

We love it when people give us a peek in their gear bags.  Go to the original post on Susie’s blog so you can see the full image with handy tags where she describes the items in her reporting kit and links to where you can find them.

susie-c:

Reblogged from interesting times.
May 22nd, 2012
onaissues
Alex Arbuckle’s Complex Relationship with the NYPD - NYTimes.com
This post on the Lens blog about a photographer covering the Occupy WallStreet protests tells a different story than is often projected in the media, especially from a journalist’s perspective. Arbuckle was interested in showing a more complete picture of the interactions between the police and protesters. He was arrested while covering the protests.
James Estrin writes, “It’s hard to miss the irony that he was arrested, apparently without cause, while he was trying to show the police officer’s humanity. At the same time his experience is a valuable lesson in the complexities of being a photojournalist.”
Read more on the Lens blog.
Photo by Alex Arbuckle.

Alex Arbuckle’s Complex Relationship with the NYPD - NYTimes.com

This post on the Lens blog about a photographer covering the Occupy WallStreet protests tells a different story than is often projected in the media, especially from a journalist’s perspective. Arbuckle was interested in showing a more complete picture of the interactions between the police and protesters. He was arrested while covering the protests.

James Estrin writes, “It’s hard to miss the irony that he was arrested, apparently without cause, while he was trying to show the police officer’s humanity. At the same time his experience is a valuable lesson in the complexities of being a photojournalist.”

Read more on the Lens blog.

Photo by Alex Arbuckle.

February 28th, 2012
onaissues

shortformblog:

Protip: If you see an image that seems a touch “unbelievable,” especially if it comes from an untested source like a brand-new blog, there’s a chance it may be fake. Very fake, even. That’s the story of this receipt that seemingly mocks the 99 percent, but is actually from a blog that’s already been taken off the Internet.

Reblogged from ShortFormBlog
February 14th, 2012
onaissues

Social Shares: A move to make the Supreme Court more accessible and other top stories

The ONA Issues Tumblr is your platform to define and explore the pressing issues in digital media and get a better fix on how they impact your work. Here are the top five posts from last week.

To share an issue or join the conversation, submit your own post, reblog on your own Tumblr or comment on a post.

February 7th, 2012
onaissues

futurejournalismproject:

On Copyright and Occupying the Wall Street Journal

Susie Cagle interviews the creators of various “Occupy” newspapers to see what reactions they’ve received from established brands. The question is whether appropriation of corporate logos, brands and marks is protected free speech or copyright infringement.

In Oakland, the Oakland Tribune sent the Occupied Oakland Tribune a cease and desist letter. In New York, the Wall Street Journal has remained silent about the Occupied Wall Street Journal.

In Chicago, there appears to be some absurdity going on.

Via The Atlantic:

A source with knowledge of to the Occupied Chicago Tribune’s legal situation who preferred not to be identified said the Chicago Tribune’s lawyer had pushed hard in the company’s demands in informal negotiations.“Occupied Chicago Tribunesaid okay, we’ll use ‘Chicago’s Occupied Tribune.’ The lawyer objected. So they said okay, we’ll change it to ‘Occupied Tribune,’ and the lawyer objected. They said okay, we’ll change it to ‘Occupied Chicago Times.’ The lawyer objected again.”

“Then he allegedly said something like, ‘You cannot have anything that has a T in the name.’ And that’s when finally it had reached such a point of absurdity that they decided to fight back.”

Image: Inaugural issue of the Occupied Wall Street Journal, via Marcus Franklin.

Reblogged from The FJP
January 25th, 2012
onaissues
December 16th, 2011
onaissues

(Video starts at 2:00)

This video filmed by a protester December 12 at the World Financial Center not only shows arrests related to Occupy Wall Street protests, but also clearly shows New York Times photographer Robert Stolarik being blocked and harassed by police officers as he tries to photograph the scene. Mr Stolarik is clearing wearing his proper press credentials.

Mr Stolarik later talked with the New York Observer about being pushed around by the police and the ongoing barring of credentialed press from the Occupy Wall Street protests. 

December 5th, 2011
onaissues
What Journalists Can Learn From: Occupiers
What do press freedom, narratives, and infrastructure have to do with Occupy Wall Street? Everything.
Read more on journalists.org.

What Journalists Can Learn From: Occupiers

What do press freedom, narratives, and infrastructure have to do with Occupy Wall Street? Everything.

Read more on journalists.org.

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