August 5th, 2014
onaissues

globalvoices:

The Russian government has tightened control over all media platforms, but it’s been especially active in corralling the Internet. News programs and other video content from state Russian television will soon flood top news websites in Russia, creating a monolithic news agenda in a market where independent media outlets have all but disappeared.

According to a new agreement between Pervyi Kanal (state-owned Channel One) and the media holding Rambler & Co., websites like Gazeta.Ru and Lenta.Ru will carry the government-controlled channel’s daily news bulletins, while other websites from the holding might rebroadcast Pervyi’s films, documentaries, and sports programming.

TJournal.ru points out that examples of embedded video content from Pervyi Kanalare already available on Lenta.ru, like this conspiratorial piece about U.S. and U.K. ‘agents’ in Germany. The 34-second video is dropped squarely in the middle of the news story, cutting it in half.

The Kremlin Is Fighting the Internet by Buying It Up

Reblogged from Global Voices Online
August 5th, 2014
onaissues

The Journalism Diversity Project has relaunched!

Created by Emma Carew, Sharon Chan, Robert Hernandez (current ONA Board Member)Michelle JohnsonDoug MitchellJuana Summers (former ONA Board Member), and Benet Wilson (current ONA Board Member), the project is a resource for those “interested in diversifying your newsroom or making sure your event is calling on a diverse group of experts.”

August 5th, 2014
onaissues

Meet Rajneesh Bhandari, one of the three 2014 MJ Bear Fellows. 

A former television journalist, Rajneesh coordinates Media Gufa, which requires journalists to be isolated in a room for 72 hours to report news stories using only social media and another group of journalists to report stories from a rural area without using the internet.

He also is working as data editor on an investigative project launched by Transparency International, teaches journalism at WLC College, Nepal, runs multimedia workshops for national and international organizations, and is working to improve digital literacy in Nepal by training young people in rural areas how to use digital tools.

Learn more about Rajneesh and the 2014 MJ Bear Fellows

August 4th, 2014
onaissues
Interested in keeping yourself and your sources safe online?
Join us in D.C. on Aug. 23 for ONA dCamp: Digital Security, a full day design camp which will explore how journalists can protect their work. 
Facilitators include staff from the International Center for Journalists, New York Times, ProPublica, Reporters Without Borders, Washington Post and more. 
Apply now.

Interested in keeping yourself and your sources safe online?

Join us in D.C. on Aug. 23 for ONA dCamp: Digital Security, a full day design camp which will explore how journalists can protect their work. 

Facilitators include staff from the International Center for Journalists, New York Times, ProPublica, Reporters Without Borders, Washington Post and more. 

Apply now.

August 4th, 2014
onaissues
Watching the Thunderdome team work so collaboratively was, to me, an example of how newsrooms have to operate to survive in the future. We need fewer egos, fewer divas, more collaboration and more stepping into the breach to help colleagues. All in all, the Thunderdome newsroom was the lowest maintenance newsroom I have ever managed.

Jim Brady, former Editor-in-Chief of Project Thunderdome (and former President of ONA’s Board of Directors) discusses the best parts of the project.

Read more: Take these lessons from the rubble of Thunderdome » Nieman Journalism Lab

August 4th, 2014
onaissues

MJ Bear Fellow Anika Anand discusses why she is interested in creating resources to help journalists grow and measure their impact. 

"I know it’s important to make those in power accountable and to shine a light in dark corners,” she says, “but once you actually do that, how do you know the difference that you’ve made if you’ve made any at all? I think this is a problem digital journalists are most suited to solve given all the tools at our disposal."

Learn more about Anika and the 2014 MJ Bear Fellows

July 29th, 2014
onaissues

Out of Sight

thenewinquiry:

tb-383

The Internet delivered on its promise of community for blind people, but accessibility is easy to overlook.

I have been blind since birth. I’m old enough to have completed my early schooling at a time when going to a special school for blind kids was the norm. In New Zealand, where I live, there is only one school for the blind. It was common for children to leave their families when they were five, to spend the majority of the year far from home in a school hostel. Many family relationships were strained as a result. Being exposed to older kids and adults with the same disability as you, however, can supply you with exemplars. It allows the blind to see other blind people being successful in a wide range of careers, raising families and being accepted in their local community. A focal point, such as a school for the blind, helps foster that kind of mentoring.

The Internet has expanded the practical meaning of the word community. New technology platforms aren’t often designed to be accessible to people unlike the designers themselves, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t used by everyone who can. For blind people, the Internet has allowed an international community to flourish where there wasn’t much of one before, allowing people with shared experiences, interests, and challenges to forge a communion. Just as important, it has allowed blind people to participate in society in ways that have often otherwise been foreclosed by prejudice. Twitter has been at the heart of this, helping bring blind people from many countries and all walks of life together. It represents one of the most empowering aspects of the Internet for people with disabilities — its fundamentally textual nature and robust API supporting an ecosystem of innovative accessible apps has made it an equalizer. Behind the keyboard, no one need know you’re blind or have any other disability, unless you choose to let them know.

Read More

Reblogged from
July 29th, 2014
onaissues
fastcompany:

NPR One rethinks everything, even ditching the Like button.
Stark white and minimally designed, the new NPR One app looks like a paradigm of technology. But surprisingly, the app isn’t powered by algorithms, filters, or other pseudo-intelligence—it’s still good old human editor curation on the backend.
“For us, the algorithm that programs the app is very importantly focused on the human curation part of it,” says NPR VP of digital media Zach Brand. “A lot of people tend to think of it in terms of machine learning—which is a portion as well—but we have dedicated staff making sure that the most important stories are populated from the outset that represent the best experience right at the first moment. As we get to know the listener, it then tailors even more to them.”
Read More>

fastcompany:

NPR One rethinks everything, even ditching the Like button.

Stark white and minimally designed, the new NPR One app looks like a paradigm of technology. But surprisingly, the app isn’t powered by algorithms, filters, or other pseudo-intelligence—it’s still good old human editor curation on the backend.

“For us, the algorithm that programs the app is very importantly focused on the human curation part of it,” says NPR VP of digital media Zach Brand. “A lot of people tend to think of it in terms of machine learning—which is a portion as well—but we have dedicated staff making sure that the most important stories are populated from the outset that represent the best experience right at the first moment. As we get to know the listener, it then tailors even more to them.”

Read More>

Reblogged from Fast Company
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