ONA Issues

Jul 29

5 tools to transform or enhance text-heavy articles | Media news

5 tools to transform or enhance text-heavy articles | Media news

Out of Sight

thenewinquiry:

tb-383

The Internet delivered on its promise of community for blind people, but accessibility is easy to overlook.

I have been blind since birth. I’m old enough to have completed my early schooling at a time when going to a special school for blind kids was the norm. In New Zealand, where I live, there is only one school for the blind. It was common for children to leave their families when they were five, to spend the majority of the year far from home in a school hostel. Many family relationships were strained as a result. Being exposed to older kids and adults with the same disability as you, however, can supply you with exemplars. It allows the blind to see other blind people being successful in a wide range of careers, raising families and being accepted in their local community. A focal point, such as a school for the blind, helps foster that kind of mentoring.

The Internet has expanded the practical meaning of the word community. New technology platforms aren’t often designed to be accessible to people unlike the designers themselves, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t used by everyone who can. For blind people, the Internet has allowed an international community to flourish where there wasn’t much of one before, allowing people with shared experiences, interests, and challenges to forge a communion. Just as important, it has allowed blind people to participate in society in ways that have often otherwise been foreclosed by prejudice. Twitter has been at the heart of this, helping bring blind people from many countries and all walks of life together. It represents one of the most empowering aspects of the Internet for people with disabilities — its fundamentally textual nature and robust API supporting an ecosystem of innovative accessible apps has made it an equalizer. Behind the keyboard, no one need know you’re blind or have any other disability, unless you choose to let them know.

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fastcompany:

NPR One rethinks everything, even ditching the Like button.
Stark white and minimally designed, the new NPR One app looks like a paradigm of technology. But surprisingly, the app isn’t powered by algorithms, filters, or other pseudo-intelligence—it’s still good old human editor curation on the backend.
“For us, the algorithm that programs the app is very importantly focused on the human curation part of it,” says NPR VP of digital media Zach Brand. “A lot of people tend to think of it in terms of machine learning—which is a portion as well—but we have dedicated staff making sure that the most important stories are populated from the outset that represent the best experience right at the first moment. As we get to know the listener, it then tailors even more to them.”
Read More>

fastcompany:

NPR One rethinks everything, even ditching the Like button.

Stark white and minimally designed, the new NPR One app looks like a paradigm of technology. But surprisingly, the app isn’t powered by algorithms, filters, or other pseudo-intelligence—it’s still good old human editor curation on the backend.

“For us, the algorithm that programs the app is very importantly focused on the human curation part of it,” says NPR VP of digital media Zach Brand. “A lot of people tend to think of it in terms of machine learning—which is a portion as well—but we have dedicated staff making sure that the most important stories are populated from the outset that represent the best experience right at the first moment. As we get to know the listener, it then tailors even more to them.”

Read More>

(via fastcompany)

“We owe you, our readers, an apology. This plagiarism is a breach of our fundamental responsibility to be honest with you — in this case, about who wrote the words on our site. Plagiarism, much less copying unchecked facts from Wikipedia or other sources, is an act of disrespect to the reader.” —

BuzzFeed addresses Benny Johnson’s plagiarism in a memo to staff. An internal investigation by BuzzFeed editors found 41 posts by Johnson that contained plagiarized material on the site. 

The ravages of BuzzFeed’s Benny Johnson - The Washington Post

Jul 21

"Never before have women dominated coverage of a war the way they are in Syria."
Read more: Rosie the scribbler : Columbia Journalism Review

"Never before have women dominated coverage of a war the way they are in Syria."

Read more: Rosie the scribbler : Columbia Journalism Review

“If you’re not including what will be the majority demographic in our country at the table in positions of leadership, your company just could not be destined for the level of success it should be destined for” —

Tristan Walker, founder of Code2040.

Meet The Man Who Wants To Diversify Silicon Valley By 2040 : Code Switch : NPR

Jul 19

Learning through making: 16 projects receive support to test ideas through Knight Prototype Fund - Knight Foundation

Jul 18

How to Be a Better Online Reader : The New Yorker

How to Be a Better Online Reader : The New Yorker

“While my personal capacity to tell technology stories in the past year has diversified, I’ve noticed something: my beat is rapidly disappearing.” —

Dave Lee, technology reporter for the BBC

Technology journalists are facing extinction — Medium

WFMU wants to build open tools to help radio stations (and others) raise money and build community » Nieman Journalism Lab

WFMU wants to build open tools to help radio stations (and others) raise money and build community » Nieman Journalism Lab