October 21st, 2014
onaissues
[We Need to Talk] might star 12 women, but it is discussing many of the topics germane in the sports world at large, including Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston’s off-field troubles, Kobe Bryant’s return from injury, and Major League Baseball’s playoffs. And it has done it without much yelling back-and-forth that typifies so many sports talk shows now.
There are challenges to making the show stick: a weekly format in a world of daily takes makes it harder to stay fresh and illuminating, and CBS Sports Network is still somewhat obscure, lesser known than giants like ESPN and possibly even more apt competitors like NBC Sports Network. And women’s voices remain an anomaly in the sports commentary world—90 percent of the sports journalism industry is white and male, according to a Women’s Media Center study.
October 21st, 2014
onaissues

Google Design has open-sourced 750 glyphs as part of the Material Design system icons pack.

October 21st, 2014
onaissues
It’s time to consider new approaches. Can serious news outlets find ways to establish trust beyond relying on the reader to divine their reputation? Can we abandon the simplistic model of “trust us because we are us?” A stronger framework of trust would allow news organizations to clarify how and why their efforts deserve readers’ confidence.

Richard Gingras and Sally Lehrman offer suggestions for how newsrooms and journalists can build trust with their readership.  

Online Chaos Demands Radical Action by Journalism to Earn Trust — Medium

October 20th, 2014
onaissues
'Caution,' 'questions,' 'sensitive' — these are all apparently synonyms for willful disregard for facts, which is a curious fit for journalism schools, institutions that purportedly train people how to report what they know.
October 20th, 2014
onaissues
October 16th, 2014
onaissues
We all know these stories of sources who take a risk to approach an institution and that institution doesn’t publish the information. I think that the existence of the Intercept or WikiLeaks or other outlets that are willing to publish that information creates a different media landscape…

…I don’t think what we’re doing is radical. I think it’s radical to censor information because the government asks you to. That’s radical.

Laura Poitras, Director and Producer, CitizenFour, to Wired. Laura Poitras on the Crypto Tools That Made Her Snowden Film Possible.

Context: Poitras is referring to the New York Times which withheld publication of the Bush administration’s warrantless wiretapping program for a year at the administration’s request.

The Tools: Poitras says she couldn’t have reported CitizenFour, her documentary on Edward Snowden and the NSA leaks, without a number of Open Source tools. These included, according to Wired, “the anonymity software Tor, the Tor-based operating system Tails, GPG encryption, Off-The-Record (OTR) encrypted instant messaging, hard disk encryption software Truecrypt, and Linux.”

Additionally, Poitras used the anonymizing operating system Tails on a computer dedicated solely for communicating with Snowden, according to Wired.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Reblogged from The FJP
October 16th, 2014
onaissues
There is sometimes a sense that we’ve decoupled computing from its cultural and artistic and humanistic context, and some of the trouble we might point to in the world we are living in—run by Wall Street and Silicon Valley—is perhaps a result of thinking of everything as just an engineering problem.
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